Delicious Turmeric Tea with Cinnamon, Ginger and Clove

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My cup of deliciousness

Turmeric is all the rage these days, and I just had to try out a recipe for cinnamon-turmeric tea I found online.  It.  Was.  Delicious.  My husband even liked it – he said it tasted like Thanksgiving.  With flavors like clove and cinnamon, and it’s pumpkin-y color, you could make this healthy drink for your holiday party.

I am sure you have seen recipes all over Facebook and Pinterest, but if you haven’t, not to worry.  I have put together some excerpts from an article on Authority Nutrition‘s website on the many benefits of turmeric:

1.  Turmeric Contains Bioactive Compounds With Powerful Medicinal Properties

Turmeric is the spice that gives curry its yellow color.  It has been used in India for thousands of years as a spice and medicinal herb.  Recently, science has started to back up what the Indians have known for a long time.

Curcumin is the main active ingredient in turmeric. It has powerful anti-inflammatory effects and is a very strong antioxidant.  However, the curcumin content of turmeric is not that high… it’s around 3%, by weight.

Most of the studies on this herb are using turmeric extracts that contain mostly curcumin itself, with dosages usually exceeding 1 gram per day.  It would be very difficult to reach these levels just using the turmeric spice in your foods.  Therefore, if you want to experience the full effects, then you need to take an extract that contains significant amounts of curcumin.

Unfortunately, curcumin is poorly absorbed into the bloodstream.  It helps to consume black pepper with it (which is used in the recipe at the end of this blog) which contains piperine… a natural substance that enhances the absorption of curcumin by 2000%!!!!

Curcumin is also fat soluble, so it may be a good idea to take it with a fatty meal.

2. Curcumin is a Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compound

While it sounds bad, nflammation is actually incredibly important.  It helps the body fight foreign invaders and also has a role in repairing damage.  Without inflammation, pathogens like bacteria could easily take over our bodies and kill us.

Although acute (short-term) inflammation is beneficial, it can become a major problem when it is chronic (long-term) and inappropriately deployed against the body’s own tissues.

It is now believed that chronic, low-level inflammation plays a major role in almost every chronic, Western disease. This includes heart disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s and various degenerative conditions.

It turns out that curcumin is strongly anti-inflammatory, it is so powerful that it matches the effectiveness of some anti-inflammatory drugs.

The key takeaway here is that curcumin is a bioactive substance that fights inflammation at the molecular level.  In several studies, its potency has compared favorably to anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical drugs… except without the side effects.

Bottom Line:  Chronic inflammation is known to be a contributor to many common Western diseases.  Curcumin can inhibit many molecules known to play major roles in inflammation.

3. Turmeric Dramatically Increases The Antioxidant Capacity of The Body

Curcumin happens to be a potent antioxidant that can neutralize free radicals due to its chemical structure.  And curcumin also boosts the activity of the body’s own antioxidant enzymes.

4. Curcumin Boosts Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Linked to Improved Brain Function and a Lower Risk of Brain Diseases

Back in the day, it was believed that neurons weren’t able to divide and multiply after early childhood.  However, it is now known that this does happen.
The neurons are capable of forming new connections, but in certain areas of the brain, they can also multiply and increase in number.

Many common brain disorders have been linked to decreased levels of this hormone.  This includes depression and Alzheimer’s disease.  There is a possibility that it could help improve memory and make you smarter.

Bottom Line: Curcumin boosts levels of the brain hormone BDNF, which increases the growth of new neurons and fights various degenerative processes in the brain.

5. Curcumin Leads to Various Improvements That Should Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease

Heart disease is the biggest killer in the world.  It turns out that heart disease is incredibly complicated and there are various things that contribute to it.  Curcumin may help reverse many steps in the heart disease process.  It also reduces inflammation and oxidation, which are also important in heart disease.

Bottom Line: Curcumin has beneficial effects on several factors known to play a role in heart disease. It improves the function of the endothelium and is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and antioxidant.

6. Turmeric Can Help Prevent (And Perhaps Even Treat) Cancer

Cancer is a terrible disease, characterized by uncontrolled growth of cells.  There are many different forms of cancer, but they do have several commonalities, some of which appear to be affected by curcumin supplementation.

Researchers have been studying curcumin as a beneficial herb in cancer treatment.  It can affect cancer growth, development and spread at the molecular level.

Studies have shown that it can reduce angiogenesis (growth of new blood vessels in tumors), metastasis (spread of cancer), as well as contributing to the death of cancerous cells.

Multiple studies have shown that curcumin can reduce the growth of cancerous cells in the laboratory and inhibit the growth of tumours in test animals.  Whether high-dose curcumin (preferably with an absorption enhancer like pepper) can help treat cancer in humans has yet to be tested properly.

However, there is some evidence that it may help prevent cancer from occurring in the first place, especially cancers of the digestive system (like colorectal cancer).

In one study in 44 men with lesions in the colon that sometimes turn cancerous, 4 grams of curcumin per day for 30 days reduced the number of lesions by 40%!

Bottom Line: Curcumin leads to several changes on the molecular level that may help prevent and perhaps even treat cancer.

7. Curcumin May be Useful in Preventing and Treating Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the world and a leading cause of dementia.  Unfortunately, no good treatment is available for Alzheimer’s yet.  Therefore, preventing it from showing up in the first place is of utmost importance.

There may be good news on the horizon, because curcumin has been shown to cross the blood-brain barrier.

One key feature of Alzheimer’s disease is a buildup of protein tangles called Amyloid plaques. Studies show that curcumin can help clear these plaques.
Whether curcumin can really slow down or even reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease needs to be studied properly.

Bottom Line: Curcumin can cross the blood-brain barrier and has been shown to lead to various improvements in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease.

8. Arthritis Patients Respond Very Well to Curcumin Supplementation

Arthritis is a common problem in Western countries.  There are several different types, but most involve some sort of inflammation in the joints.

Given that curcumin is a potent anti-inflammatory, it makes sense that it could help with arthritis.  Several studies show this to be true.

In a study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, curcumin was even more effective than an anti-inflammatory drug.  Many other studies have looked at the effects of curcumin on arthritis and noted improvements in various symptoms.

Bottom Line: Arthritis is a common disorder characterized by joint inflammation. Many studies show that curcumin can help treat symptoms of arthritis and is in some cases more effective than anti-inflammatory drugs.

9. Studies Show That Curcumin Has Incredible Benefits Against Depression

Curcumin has shown some promise in treating depression.  In a controlled trial, 60 patients were randomized into three groups.  One group took prozac, another group took a gram of curcumin and the third group took both prozac and curcumin.  After 6 weeks, curcumin had led to improvements that were similar to prozac.  The group that took both prozac and curcumin fared best.

According to this (small) study, curcumin is as effective as an antidepressant.  Depression is also linked to reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and a shrinking hippocampus, a brain area with a role in learning and memory.  There is also some evidence that curcumin can boost the brain neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine.

Bottom Line: A study in 60 depressed patients showed that curcumin was as effective as prozac in alleviating the symptoms of depression.

10. Curcumin May Help Delay Aging

Given that oxidation and inflammation are believed to play a role in ageing, curcumin may have effects that go way beyond just prevention of disease.

Now for some tasty, and mega-healthy, turmeric tea!!!

Gather your ingredients.

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Simmer all spices in water for ten minutes, strain.

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Put 1/3 cup of tea in a mug and add some raw honey (even better, how about some local honey!). Then add in 2/3 cup of milk and stir well.

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CINNAMON-TURMERIC TEA

1-2 tsps turmeric
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp freshly grated ginger
3 cloves (I had ground clove, so I used a tea sachet)
A pinch of grated nutmeg
4 peppercorns
1 1/2 to 2 cups of water
1 tsp raw honey
1/2 cup milk of choice

(**Add some pure, therapeutic-grade essential oils for added health benefits!  My choices would be myrrh, clove or cinnamon bark.  But only a drop or two.)

Simmer all spices in water for ten minutes, strain.  Put 1/3 tea, 2/3 milk in a teacup.  Add raw honey and milk and stir.  Adjust to taste.

You can save the remainder of your tea mixture in a container in the fridge for up to 5 days.  Just warm up a batch of the mixture each time, and then add the honey and milk.

(**turmeric tends to sink to the bottom.  Be sure to stir/shake well before each use).

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If you need some direction in choosing essential oils that are pure and effective, please leave me your e-mail address below.  Happy to help!

To your health!

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4 thoughts on “Delicious Turmeric Tea with Cinnamon, Ginger and Clove

    1. Hey, well, I have not done anything further on my thyroid. I am weaning off of anti-anxiety and anti-depressants, because I have read how many of my complaints/issues are actually side effects of the drugs. Since my thyroid levels are normal, I am going to wait until later in the year for the fine-needle biopsy on the goiters.

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      1. The doctor should consider an ultrasound first. If it shows no changes in nodule structure , biopsy may not be necessary. Variations in the size (like +/- 1 mm) are considered normal variations.
        Thanks for responding to my comments, it means a lot to me:)

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      2. Absolutely, I always respond!! 😀

        I actually did have the ultrasound, and they said since some of the nodules were solid and calcified, I should get the biopsy. So, I will at some point this year.

        Like

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